ROTOR CLIP COMPANY, INC · 187 Davidson Avenue · Somerset NJ · 08873 · USA

+1-732-569-7333 · www.rotorclip.com · For more info: info@rotorclip.com

APPLICATION NOTES

Robotic Hands get a grip on savings with Rotor Clip Retaining Rings

Pneumatic robotic parallel grippers are used in applications that require automated picking up of parts and assemblies. They can be configured to grip the outside edges of a work piece, or open out to put pressure on the inside of a work piece.

A typical pneumatic gripper. The parallel gripper jaws at the bottom can be configured to grip the inside/outside of a work piece.

Retaining rings are used to retain the cap that holds the piston in place as it moves up and down. The two parallel grippers shown on the right employ two different style retaining rings, tapered and constant section, and bring up an important point about retaining ring selection.

 

The parameters of an application actually determine which retaining ring is best to use, and this can vary from assembly to assembly. Selecting the correct type of retaining ring based on variables such as installation/removal requirements, anticipated thrust load, and end play take-up can ensure the retaining ring you choose will perform reliably, while significantly reducing costs.

There are three main types of retaining rings available to the designer: tapered, constant section and spiral. Again, the final selection of a type and size retaining rings depends upon the previously mentioned parameters.

 

To meet today’s stringent standards for cost reduction, the designer must consider all options. This includes retaining rings and the flexibility afforded by the different styles when searching for an appropriate fastener to accomplish a given task. Matching this task to the appropriate ring can help you meet your cost reduction targets without sacrificing quality or performance.

 

 

The gripper on the left utilizes a tapered section ring to retain the cap and piston. The smaller version on the right employs a lower cost, constant section ring. Selecting the type of ring most suited to your application can greatly reduce costs.

There are three main types of retaining rings available to the designer: tapered, constant section and spiral. Again, the final selection of a type and size retaining rings depends upon the previously mentioned parameters.

TAPERED SECTION RINGS

These make uniform contact with the groove with a gap between the lugs. The lugs and lug holes are not meant to interfere with the application, but provide a convenient means to install/remove the ring using manual or automated equipment. The designer of the gripper shown on the left of the photo determined that a tapered ring was best suited for this application.

CONSTANT SECTION  RINGS

These are elliptical when installed in the groove, making only 3-point contact. As a result, they accommodate less force than a tapered section ring, making them an economic alternative to this type of ring. The gripper shown on the right of the photo employs a constant section ring as the designer determined that this type of ring would be sufficient to accommodate the load needed to retain the cap. That decision saved costs as constant section rings generally cost less than tapered rings.

SPIRAL RETAINING RINGS

These rings make 360° contact with the groove, unlike the other two types. Using this type of ring would be “overkill” in the gripper applications shown, but are effective in a variety of automotive and industrial applications.